Cooking Conversions Confusion

scales

One of the things that I find the most confusing about following recipes from the Internet is the different measurements used. Some are imperial, some in metric and others in cups.  I always want to ask if it is a big cup or a small cup?

This isn’t something that bothers me too much as I am not a strict follower of recipes. I have more of a tendency to use my senses, such as taste, sight and touch, to decide if a recipe is going well or not. I also have enough cooking experience to tell if the processes look right and if the quantities will do what they are supposed to be doing in a dish, whether this is adding flavour, thickening a sauce or changing the colour. 

To make things easier for other people who use recipes off the Internet, I thought I would add in this simple guide for cooking conversions.

Volume

  • 250 ml = 8 fl oz = 1 cup
  • 180 ml = 6 fl oz = 3/4 cup
  • 150 ml =5 fl oz = 2/3 cup
  • 120 ml=4 fl oz =1/2 cup
  • 75 ml = 2 1/2 fl oz = 1/3 cup
  • 60 ml = 2 1/4 fl oz = 1/4 cup
  • 30 ml = 1 fl oz = 1/8 cup
  • 15 ml = 1/2 fl oz = 1 tablespoon

Weights

  • 1/2 oz = 15 g
  • 1 oz = 30 g
  • 2 oz = 60g
  • 3 oz = 90 g
  • 4 oz = 110 g
  • 5 oz = 140 g
  • 6 oz = 170 g
  • 7 oz = 200 g
  • 8 oz = 225 g
  • 9 oz = 255 g
  • 10 oz = 280 g
  • 11 oz = 310 g
  • 12 oz = 340 g
  • 13 oz = 370 g
  • 14 oz = 400g
  • 15 oz = 425 g
  • 1 lb = 450g

The US cup measurements are more complex for weights as it depends on the ingredient. You can find an easy online guide here: http://allrecipes.co.uk/how-to/44/cooking-conversions.aspx

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