I’m In It for the Long Haul

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Although I have been working as a freelance writer for seven years now, this blog is a relatively new venture. In fact, as I am writing this, it is just eight weeks old. I started off with big ambitions, but I have found it more challenging than I thought and I have not produced anywhere enough content. 

However, this hasn’t deterred me from keeping going. This week, I have had so much paid work that I had planned not to write anything on my food blog at all. I was going to concentrate solely on my paid work and sorting out the house. I don’t know how, but at the end of each working day, I have found myself taking my laptop to bed with me as I couldn’t resist the urge to sit and post something on The Fruity Tart

I have decided that there is something very addictive about blogging. I love checking my views, my likes and who is now following my blog. However, this isn’t the only addictive part of having a blog. I have also become addicted to checking out the reader section of WordPress to see what other people have posted. I am now following a wide range of blogs, so my reading material is diverse. While some are fellow food bloggers, I am also enjoying reading poetry, historical and factual information, personal experiences and blogs about all sorts of niche subjects. 

Regardless of how successful my own blog is, blogging is so addictive that I am definitely in this for the long haul. 

Written in response to the Daily Prompt ‘Haul’ on The Daily Post

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You Know You’re a Foodie When…….

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You know you’re a foodie when…….. your presents are food and cooking related! Its Easter Sunday today and I got some rather unusual gifts from my Mum. My children got the traditional Easter eggs from her, a book and a T-shirt each. She gave my partner an Easter egg and a small bottle of lemon vodka (she has been experimenting with making different flavours of vodka recently). What did I get? A bag of organic pasta flour and a set of three chutneys- mango & pineapple, chilli jam, and jalapeno pepper chutney. 

This is not the first time my Mum has bought me cooking presents. She knows I am not that interested in clothes and my house is full of enough clutter. Cooking related items are the perfect gift for me. At Christmas, I received a new pasta maker and a wooden spaghetti hanging rack.

On my 30th birthday, she made one of my best presents ever. It was a hamper full of Indian spices, The Three Sisters Indian Cookbook, and some tableware for serving Indian food. These may seem like strange gifts to other people, but to me, they are perfect. 

 

New Facebook Page and Wanting to Share Great Blogs

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Not wanting to bore all my Facebook friends who are not interested in food and cooking in the posts from my blogs, I have set up a separate Facebook page devoted to food and drink. I intend not only to share my own posts on this page, I will also use it to post other articles and videos I think are interesting about food. I also thought it would be a great opportunity for me to share some of the many fantastic food blogs I have read on WordPress since I started this new blog.

I would welcome any of my followers on here liking, sharing and inviting others to this page. The link is here https://www.facebook.com/TheFruityTart/. Also, if you are interested in me sharing some of your blog posts onto this page, feel free to show interest in the comment section below. I am looking forward to giving other people the opportunity to read some of the fantastic posts and ideas that I read on here every day. 

Not a Fan of Tasting Menus

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The latest trend in high-end restaurants is to have a set tasting menu. This consists of around six or seven smaller plates of food that focus on using just a few quality ingredients and presenting them in a beautiful way. Although this is now fashionable, I have to say that I am not a fan.

The first reason is the way the menus are presented. They describe a dish as lamb * lentils* carrots, or lobster* fennel* tomatoes. Is this not simply a list of ingredients? I always want to ask what cut of lamb is it? How is it cooked? Is there a sauce? In what way are the vegetables served? These are the pieces of information I need to know before I order. I would much prefer to see a dish described as ‘Slow-cooked lamb shank on a bed of puy lentils served with julienne carrots and a red wine reduction’. Without having to ask further questions, I know exactly what to expect from my meal. 

The second issue I have is the set menu situation. A tasting menu is a list of dishes and you are given all of them in the order in which they are presented on a menu. There is not a choice of three appetizers or a selection of main dishes from which you can choose. You are simply given exactly what is listed on the menu. Part of the joy of eating out for me is perusing the menu and deciding what I fancy to eat that day. A tasting menu takes away that element of pleasure from me.

Another issue is the cost. It costs a small fortune for two people to try the tasting menu at a top restaurant. When I was looking into eating at one of the establishments that serve this type of menu recently, I calculated that for my partner and I to go out for the meal, it would cost a week and a half’s salary. Diners can also opt to have wines specially selected to accompany each course. To do this, you can expect to double the cost again. I would much rather choose one bottle of wine I liked and drink that. 

My final issue is more about the type of establishment that serves tasting menus rather than the tasting menus themselves. I find them a little pretentious and I feel uncomfortable. I would rather dine in a restaurant that is a little more relaxed and where I can feel free to be myself; talking and laughing with my dining companions. 

Of course, tasting menus are not all bad and I can see why they have become so popular. It is an opportunity to sample some of the finest dishes made by top chefs that are created using the highest quality ingredients and presented in a beautiful way. When you put it like that, a tasting menu is a very tempting dining option. However, this style of dining simply isn’t for me.

Why is Breakfast So Difficult?

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NOTE: This photograph is quite clearly not my kitchen as I cannot face the shame of putting up a picture of the scene of devastation left by my kids in the morning! This is a free pic from Google Images chosen simply to represent breakfast. 

With 20 years of parenting experience and plenty of practice making homemade meals every day, you would think I had the breakfast routine pretty much sorted. However, that is definitely not the case and it seems the most difficult meal of the day to organize.

In the evenings, we always sit down together as a family to a homemade meal I have prepared. This usually involves me cooking using a variety of ingredients for approximately an hour before sitting down at the table. To make the meal, I will often have both the hob and the oven on while using an array of pans, dishes, and utensils.

At the same time as cooking, I usually have the dog running around my ankles, my younger children racing through the house, my older son asking about going out with his mates and my daughter ringing me to ask all sorts of ridiculous questions (she has just moved into her own place and realized she needs to function like a normal person). 

Despite these complications and distractions, I am perfectly capable of serving a decent meal to the family, so why can I not function to serve breakfast?

Breakfast at my house is typically either cereal, porridge, toast or a yogurt for the children and a strong cup of coffee for me. To achieve these two ‘meals’, I simply need to chuck a couple of slices of bread into a toaster and pour some cereal and milk into a bowl. Simple enough?

It seems to verge on the impossible to do this some days. Nobody seems to make it to the dining table at breakfast and eats their breakfast wherever they are sitting, I serve the wrong food to the wrong child on a regular basis, I burn the toast and spill cereal all over the kitchen. The minute the food hits the bowls, the children change their mind about what they want and they refuse to eat what you serve. 

Yes, a food blogger and former catering professional is admitting she cannot cook toast and serving cereal is an impossibility. I guess I am just not a morning person! I am just thankful that my husband feeds himself in the morning.